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5 Cards in this Set

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  • Back
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THE POET HORACE CONTEMPLATES AN INVITATION

Maecēnās et Vergilius mē hodiē vocant. Quid cōgitāre dēbeō? Quid dēbeō respondēre? Sī errō, mē saepe monent et culpant; sī nōn errō, mē laudant. Quid hodiē cōgitāre dēbeō?
Maecenas and Vergil are calling me today. What should I think? What should I reply? If I am wrong, they often warn and blame me; if I am not wrong, they praise me. What should I think today?
CATULLUS BIDS HIS GIRLFRIEND FAREWELL
Puella mea mē nōn amat. Valē, puella! Catullus obdūrat: poēta puellam nōn amat, fōrmam puellae nōn laudat, puellae rosās nōn dat, et puellam nōn bāsiat! Īra mea est magna! Obdūrō, mea puella - sed sine tē nōn valeō.
CATULLUS BIDS HIS GIRLFRIEND FAREWELL
My girl does not love me. Good-bye, girl! Catullus is firm: the poet does not love the girl, he does not praise the girl's beauty, he does not give the girl roses, and he does not kiss the girl! My anger is great! I am firm, my girl – but without you I am not well.
THE GRASS IS ALWAYS GREENER
Agricola et vītam et fortūnam nautae saepe laudat; nauta magnam fortūnam et vītam poētae saepe laudat; et poēta vītam et agrōs agricolae laudat. Sine philosophiā avārī virī dē pecūniā semper cōgitant: multam pecūniam habent, sed pecūnia multa virum avārum nōn satiat. (Horace)
THE GRASS IS ALWAYS GREENER
The farmer often praises both the life and fortune of the sailor; the sailor often praises the great fortune and life of the poet; the poet praises both the life and fields of the farmer. Without philosophy, greedy men are always thinking about money: they have much money, but much money does not satisfy a greedy man.
Nōn cēnat sine aprō noster, Tite, Caeciliānus:
bellum convīvam Caeciliānus habet!
Titus, our Caecilianus does not dine without a boar: Caecilianus has a pretty dinner-guest!
Martial 7.59: Titus, the poem's addressee, but not its victim.

aper, aprī, boar, pig
convīva, -ae, dinner guest (one of a few masc. first decl. nouns)
"Exercitus noster est magnus," Persicus inquit, "et propter numerum sagittārum nostrārum caelum nōn vidēbitis!" Tum Lacedaemonius respondet: "In umbrā, igitur, pugnābimus!" Et Leōnidas, rēx Lacedaemoniōrum, exclāmat: "Pugnāte cum animīs, Lacedaemoniī; hodiē apud umbrās fortasse cēnābimus!"
"Our army is great," says the Persian, "and because of the number of our arrows you will not see the sky!" Then the Spartan replies: "Then we shall fight in the shade!" And Leonidas, king of the Spartans, exclaims: "Fight with courage, Spartans; perhaps today we shall dine among ghosts!"
exercitus, army
Persicus, ī, a Persian
inquit, says
sagitta, -ae, arrow
Lacedaemonius, ī, a Spartan
u
mbra, -ae, shade, shadow; ghost
apud + acc. among
fortasse, adv. perhaps

<Play on words with umbra "shade/shadow" and "shade/ghost"; Spartans were renowned for their laconic statements, as a matter of fact the word "laconic" comes from a word for "Spartan">

an anecdote from the battle of Thermopylae, 480 B.C. in which the Persians under king Xerxes defeated the Spartans under Leonidas.