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41 Cards in this Set

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Formal Analysis: Aula Palatina, Germany / Late Antique Europe. early 4th century CE, brick
 
Content:
-early Christian church
-Roman arch
-apse--half dome
-massive rectangular meeting space
 
Style:
-apse

Formal Analysis: Aula Palatina, Germany / Late Antique Europe. early 4th century CE, brick



Content:


-early Christian church


-Roman arch


-apse--half dome


-massive rectangular meeting space



Style:


-apse

-link from true Roman basilica to true Christian churches


-sets new standard


-massive meeting place--church and religion is open to all

Formal Analysis: Catecomb of Priscilla, Rome, Italy / Late Antique Europe, 200-400 CE, plaster and paint, #48
 
Content:
-earliest Christian art
-loculi--slots for dead bodies
 
 
Style:
-trying to resemble natural stone

Formal Analysis: Catecomb of Priscilla, Rome, Italy / Late Antique Europe, 200-400 CE, plaster and paint, #48



Content:


-earliest Christian art


-loculi--slots for dead bodies




Style:


-trying to resemble natural stone

-carved by hand underground for the burial of early Christians

Formal Analysis: Catacomb of Priscilla: Greek Chapel, Rome, Italy / Late Antique Europe, 200-400 CE, plaster, brick, and paint, #48
 
Content:
-cubiculum 
-for Priscila's family members 
-new and old testament scenes

Formal Analysis: Catacomb of Priscilla: Greek Chapel, Rome, Italy / Late Antique Europe, 200-400 CE, plaster, brick, and paint, #48



Content:


-cubiculum


-for Priscila's family members


-new and old testament scenes

-plaster then paint


-emphasis of teachings of Christ


-invention of Christian iconography

Formal Analysis: Catacomb of Priscilla: Orant Fresco, Rome, Italy / Late Antique Europe, 200-400 CE, plaster and paint, #48
 
-woman
-mother, marriage, orant (praying, blessed after-life--salvation)
-face is naturalistically

Formal Analysis: Catacomb of Priscilla: Orant Fresco, Rome, Italy / Late Antique Europe, 200-400 CE, plaster and paint, #48



-woman


-mother, marriage, orant (praying, blessed after-life--salvation)


-face is naturalistically

-refers to the position of the middle figure (orant position)


-contraversy that there were women priests

Formal Analysis: Catacomb of Priscilla: Good Shepherd Fresco, Rome, Italy / Late Antique Europe, 200-400 CE, plaster and paint, #48
 
-Christ
-controposto--someone who had Roman painting training 
-symmetrical
-peacocks--eternal life

Formal Analysis: Catacomb of Priscilla: Good Shepherd Fresco, Rome, Italy / Late Antique Europe, 200-400 CE, plaster and paint, #48



-Christ


-controposto--someone who had Roman painting training


-symmetrical


-peacocks--eternal life


.

Formal Analysis: Old St. Peter's Basilica, Rome, Italy / late Antique Europe, early 4th century CE, roof: wood--complete disrepair
 
-nave, large central area
-narthex--adaptation of the portico
-transept--wings (hallways) off of the apse
-atrium-...

Formal Analysis: Old St. Peter's Basilica, Rome, Italy / late Antique Europe, early 4th century CE, roof: wood--complete disrepair



-nave, large central area


-narthex--adaptation of the portico


-transept--wings (hallways) off of the apse


-atrium--central courtyard


-gatehouse--grand entrance


-two side aisles--on the sides of the nave



-no longer present--where the new St. Peter's cathedral is


-whole building is a cross


Formal Analysis: Santa Sabina, Rome, Italy / Late Antique Europe, 422-432 CE, stone, #49
 
-early Christian church
-original windows were made of celenite (clear stone)
-brings back colonade with two side aisles
-corinthian columns
-massive spaces...

Formal Analysis: Santa Sabina, Rome, Italy / Late Antique Europe, 422-432 CE, stone, #49



-early Christian church


-original windows were made of celenite (clear stone)


-brings back colonade with two side aisles


-corinthian columns


-massive spaces


-wooden coffered ceiling


-original wooden doors are still on the church--paneled doors, each panel depicting a different biblical scene

-built on the land of the 4th dynasty emperor Sabina--was stoned to death because she was converted to Christianity by her servant who was also stoned to death


-later made a Christian saint

Formal Analysis: Santa Sabina plan, Rome, Italy / Late Antique Europe, 422-432 CE, #49

Formal Analysis: Santa Sabina plan, Rome, Italy / Late Antique Europe, 422-432 CE, #49

.

Formal Analysis: Rebecca and Eliezer at the Well and Jacob Wrestling the Angel, from the Vienna Genesis, Early Byzantine Europe, early sixth century CE, animal skin and paint, #50
 
-from one of the earliest books that exists--medieval book--rare
...

Formal Analysis: Rebecca and Eliezer at the Well and Jacob Wrestling the Angel, from the Vienna Genesis, Early Byzantine Europe, early sixth century CE, animal skin and paint, #50



-from one of the earliest books that exists--medieval book--rare


-folios--page


-codex, very similar to a modern book


-vellum or parchment animal skins--finely tanned then written on--much more durable than papyrus scrolls of Egypt


-illuminated manuscripts


-hand painted


-words are painted in silver

-step back in art technique

Formal Analysis: San Vitale, Ravenna, Italy / Early Byzantine Europe, 526-547 CE, #51
 
Content:
-central plan church--never took root
-eight sides to in, smaller octanglenal raised center
-interrior--stone columns, new style of capitals, three st...

Formal Analysis: San Vitale, Ravenna, Italy / Early Byzantine Europe, 526-547 CE, #51



Content:


-central plan church--never took root


-eight sides to in, smaller octanglenal raised center


-interrior--stone columns, new style of capitals, three stories

-Justinian wanted to rebuild the Roman empire

Formal Analysis: San Vitale: Justinian Panel, Ravenna, Italy / Early Byzantine Europe, 526-547 CE, #51
 
Content:
-glass mosaic
-Justinian in the center
-static frontal position
-stylized facial features

Formal Analysis: San Vitale: Justinian Panel, Ravenna, Italy / Early Byzantine Europe, 526-547 CE, #51



Content:


-glass mosaic


-Justinian in the center


-static frontal position


-stylized facial features

.

Formal Analysis: San Vitale: Theodora Plan, Ravenna, Italy / Early Byzantine Europe, 526-547 CE, #51

Formal Analysis: San Vitale: Theodora Plan, Ravenna, Italy / Early Byzantine Europe, 526-547 CE, #51

.

Formal Analysis: Haiga Sophia, Constantinople (Istanbul) / Anthemius of Tralles and Isidorus of Miletus, 532-537 CE, #52
 
Content:
-virgin thiotcos and child (virgin Mary and Christ)
-over 16 feet tall
-commissioned to replace on of the plasters ...

Formal Analysis: Haiga Sophia, Constantinople (Istanbul) / Anthemius of Tralles and Isidorus of Miletus, 532-537 CE, #52



Content:


-virgin thiotcos and child (virgin Mary and Christ)


-over 16 feet tall


-commissioned to replace on of the plasters that had been destroyed



-classical Byzantine


-gold halo


-highly stylized face--nose and eyes


-feet--dangle from underneath clothing


-characteristic hand positions--signify sainthood and the belief in Christianity


-face ages children--small bodies, old man faces


-mosaic

-Leo the 3 believed the worship of icons was causing the fall of Rome--created movement iconiclaism


-two branches of iconiclaism--one wants to protect the worship of icons and people against the worship of icons

Formal Analysis: Merovingian looped fibula, Early medieval Europe, mid-sixth century CE, gold and precious stones, #53
 
Content:
 
Style:
-zoomorphic

Formal Analysis: Merovingian looped fibula, Early medieval Europe, mid-sixth century CE, gold and precious stones, #53



Content:



Style:


-zoomorphic

.

Formal Analysis: Virgin (Theotokos) and Child between Saints Theodore and George, Early Byzantine Europe, 6th or early 7th century CE, #54

Formal Analysis: Virgin (Theotokos) and Child between Saints Theodore and George, Early Byzantine Europe, 6th or early 7th century CE, #54

Contextual Analysis:


-survived iconiclaism

Formal Analysis: Lindisfarne Gospels: St. Matthew, cross-carpet page, Early medieval Europe / (Hiberno Saxon), 700 CE, #55



Content:


-illuminated manuscript


-highly decorative


-cross carpet page


-original bibles--religious books


-appeal to literate and illiterate


-northern European


-reliance on linear design


-produced in a scriptorium--several monks would sit at desks and copy the manuscripts


-gold leaf, mineral paints, vellum (lamb skin)



-zoomorphic style

-influenced by islamic rugs


-rise of islam at the same time christianity was in Europe

Formal Analysis: Lindisfarne Gospels: St. Luke portrait page, Early medieval Europe / (Hiberno Saxon), 700 CE, #55



Content:


-intricate decorations that almost appear to be animals (peacocks and butterflies)

.

Formal Analysis: Lindisfarne Gospels: St. Luke incipit page, Early medieval Europe / (Hiberno Saxon), 700 CE, #55



Content:



Style:


-islam spread throughout Southern Europe


-started in Syria

Formal Analysis: Great Mosque, Cordoba, Spain / Umayyad, 785-786 CE, #56
 
Content:
-Islamic approbriation of the arch--especially on exterior
-key hole looking entrance way
-little representation of living things (no humans only animals)--geometr...

Formal Analysis: Great Mosque, Cordoba, Spain / Umayyad, 785-786 CE, #56



Content:


-Islamic approbriation of the arch--especially on exterior


-key hole looking entrance way


-little representation of living things (no humans only animals)--geometric design


-candied cane decorated arches



Style:


-greek and roman structures with Islamic approbriation (columns, arches, domes)


-angular, geometric--very mathematic


-borrowed tremendously from the hypostyle hall

Contextual Analysis:


-shift from living depictions to heavy in geometric design--change from Christianity to Islamic


-domes, arches, columns with Islamic approbriation--specific style

Formal Analysis: Great Mosque Plan, Cordoba, Spain / Umayyad, 785-786 CE, #56
 
Content:
-islamic mosque surrounding a previously Christian Church
-three stories tall
-highly decorated 
 
Style:
-buttress--external support 
-quibla wall--special t...

Formal Analysis: Great Mosque Plan, Cordoba, Spain / Umayyad, 785-786 CE, #56



Content:


-islamic mosque surrounding a previously Christian Church


-three stories tall


-highly decorated



Style:


-buttress--external support


-quibla wall--special to the islamic mosque--generally south facing--must face towards Mecca

,

Formal Analysis: Pyxis of al-Mughira, Umayyad, 986 CE, #57



Content:


-belonged to al-Mughira--son


-inscription to al-Mughira around rim


-box


-motifs symbolic of royal power


-luxury item


-unique because there is depiction of human-like figures


-ivory

.

Formal Analysis: Church of Sainte-Foy, Conques, France / Romanesque Europe, Chruch: 1050-1130 CE, #58



Content:


-center of a community


-two towers on the westwork (front fascade of a Romanesque church)


-relatively stark looking still


-massive construction


-ceiling is much higher


-radiating chapels surround the apse to house the reliquaries and reliques

-more about massive functional church--not about being ornate


-needed to house all the pilgraming worshipers


-Christian church is essentially funding the rebirth of Europe--saving the people--tremendous amount of power


-all about the pilgrammage and housing the reliques

Formal Analysis: The Last Judgement (tympanum), Conques, France / Romanesque Europe, ninth century CE, #58



Content:


-most decorative aspect of the outside of the church


-relief sculpture


-right above the front doors


-subject matter = last judgement


-carved out of stone


-half is heaven half is hell--split down the middle

-reminder of how the morals of how you live on earth will reflect in your afterlife


-entrance into heaven--entrance into the church


-grotesque creatures that are damned to hell


-remind the pilgrim that they will be judged


-way for church to gain support

Formal Analysis: Reliquary of Saint Foy, Conques, France / Romanesque Europe, ninth century CE, #58



-sculpted containers that held the reliecks


-wood with gold and silver with inlayed stones sculpted on top of the wood


-one of the most lavishly decorated


-18 to 24 inches tall--not big

-great amount of wealth went into them

Formal Analysis: Bayeux Tapestry, Calvary Attack, Romanesque Europe / (English or Norman), 1066-1080 CE, #59



Content:


-textile


-tells a story of the Battle of Hasting


-woven linen


-uniting of England and France


-simplified depiction of human form



Style:


-anglo-saxon, Romanesque


-embroidered


-center register--two borders


-eight colors of colored yarn


-simplistic stylized

-narrative story


-unique--not many tapestrys survive

Formal Analysis: Bayeux Tapestry, First Meal, Romanesque Europe / (English or Norman), 1066-1080 CE, #59



Content:


-text helps document and narrate the story


-depicts the celebration of the war being over and the two sides unifying


.

Formal Analysis: Chartes Cathedral, Chartes, France / Gothic Europe, Original:1145-1155 CE, Reconstructed: 1194-1220 CE, #60



Content:


-emphasis on geometry


-jamb statues (of past queens and kings--relation between royalty and the church)--purely decorative


-France is birth place of Gothic style


Notre Dame



Content:


-stained glass


-only three part elevation--allows for longer glass pieces and higher ceilings


-not seen until the Gothic Cathedral


-depicts the Virgin Mary and Christ the child



-ceilings reach higher to gods


-bring in correlation of light

Cathedral plan



Content:


-all focused on the life of Virgin Mary (whole cathedral)


-every aspect is a work of art


-typanum--Romanesque but still utilized--West work is Romanesque


dedication page



-heavily illustrated bible--generally for a Royal Family


-famous Queen who took over after her husband dided--people didn't support her--assured the rein of her son King Louis the ninth


-patron and scribe


.

.

,

foreshortening--the idea of creating realistic depth--application of a subject, creates movement

.

Formal Analysis: Golden Haggadah (The Plaques of Egypt, Scenes of Liberation, and Preparation for Passover), Late medieval Spain, 1320 CE, #64



Content:


-huge change from polytheistic religions to monotheistic religions


-domination of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam in Europe


-illuminated manuscript


-phases of


-



Style:

.

Formal Analysis: Alhambra Palace, Granada, Spain / Nasrid Dynasty, 1354-1391 CE, #65



Content:


-named for rose colored stone found in the region that the building is made of



Style:

.

Formal Analysis: Alhambra Palace: Court of the Lions, Granada, Spain / Nasrid Dynasty, 1354-1391 CE, #65

.

Formal Analysis: Alhambra Palace: Hall of the Sisters, Granada, Spain / Nasrid Dynasty, 1354-1391 CE, #65



Content:


-water has tremendous symbolism in Islam


-symbolic of oasis' that allowed Islam to spread


-dome--ornimentation of the architectural standard


-height of Islamic religion in Spain as well as the fall of Islamic faith

Formal Analysis: Alhambra Palace Plan, Granada, Spain / Nasrid Dynasty, 1354-1391 CE, #65



Content:


-added onto multiple times--unique unorganized plan


-the court of the lions (cross)--most tell tale feature

.

Formal Analysis: Annunciation Triptych (Merode Altarpiece), Workshop of Robert Campin, 1427-1432 CE, #66



Content:


-prominent 3 panel altar piece


-relatively simple appearance


-egg-tempra paint is introduced--applied to wood


-richer color pallet


-natural form--return to humanism


-maniera greca--Greek style


-advancement of space--one point perspective


-

.

Formal Analysis: Pazzi Chapel, Basilica di Santa Coroce in Florence, Italy / Filippo Brunelleschi (architect), 1429-1461 CE, #67



-reviving classical architectural elements and developing it into a new style


-central plan


-creamy white with green-gray borders


-Italian style is defined by Brunelleschi

.

Formal Analysis: The Arnolfini Portrait, Jan van Eyck, 1434 CE, #68

.

Formal Analysis: David, Donatello, 1440-1460 CE, #69

.