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4 Cards in this Set

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CREATE A CALM, OPEN ENVIRONMENT
Setting a calm, open and accepting tone is important. The social worker can do this through using body language, for instance, having a strong, open and welcoming posture. Similarly, a social worker can use her tone of voice to create a soothing, and relaxed feel. This can be helpful if the client is displaying anxiety or tension.
ACTIVE LISTENING
Listening is one of the most important skills for a clinical interview, since a clinician's reaction to a client is a way that he can encourage communication and offer validation. Most clinicians and social workers employ the technique of active listening, which means letting the other person know that you acknowledge what is being said, without disrupting what they are saying. When a therapist practices active listening, she makes eye contact, nods her head and may make verbal acknowledgments.
OPEN VS. CLOSED QUESTIONS
How questions are asked is an essential skill for a clinical social work interview. The social worker's line of questioning will have a direct effect on what type of information is shared and whether or not the client feels comfortable sharing. Basic lines of questioning include open-ended and closed questions. Open-ended questions are often preferred because they are usually the best way to get a person to talk. An example of an open-ended question would be, "What's going on with you?" In contrast, closed questions, those with definite answers, might be used if a client is overly anxious and cannot calm down during the interview.
PERSON-IN-THE-ENVIRONMENT APPROACH
Social workers are trained to understand not just how the individual operates, but how he is connected to his environment and the community surrounding him. Therefore, interview techniques with a clinical social worker, may include questions about the clients family, social supports and communities. Such questions may help to explain the larger scope of some problems, which may help the client to understand her own experience. They may also lead to future interventions, such as connecting the client with community resources and scheduling sessions with the client's family.