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12 Cards in this Set

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Antigen
Molecule that triggers a specific immune response.
Antibody
Antigen‐binding molecule secreted by plasma cells.
Enzyme‐linked immunosorbent assay.
What does ELISA stand for?
Doctors use the immune response when we are vaccinated against diseases.
How do doctors use the immune response to 
protect you from disease?
Our immune system remembers the pathogens to which we have been exposed, and the next time we are exposed to the pathogens our immune system attacks them more quickly and efficiently.
How do doctors use the immune response to protect you from disease?
Doctors take advantage of this priming effect by exposing us to inactivated pathogens (killed or weakened organisms that cannot make us sick) so that if we are later exposed to the live pathogen, our body will mount a strong and immediate antibody response, reducing or eliminating the chance that it will make us sick.
How do doctors use the immune response to protect you from disease?
Controls are needed to make sure that the experiment worked. If there are no positive controls and the sample is negative, we can't know if the sample was truly negative or if the assay didn't work.
Why do you need to assay positive and negative 
control samples as well as your experimental  samples?
Conversely, without a negative control, there is no way of knowing if all samples (positive or not) would have given a positive result.
Why do you need to assay positive and negative control samples as well as your experimental samples?
Assaying the samples in triplicate is another control.
Why did you assay your samples in triplicate?
If you do not get the same result in all triplicate wells, you have a problem with your experimental technique or you have made a pipetting error.
Why did you assay your samples in triplicate?
In a clinical laboratory, the experiment would have to be repeated.
Why did you assay your samples in triplicate?
Elisa For Tracking Disease Outbreaks
Micro Lab 13 - is