Study your flashcards anywhere!

Download the official Cram app for free >

  • Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/46

Click to flip

46 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back

autonomy

independence

cognitive development

student's understanding of concepts and the ability to think and reason

cognitive schemes

based on experiences

student's learn from

making mistakes


exploration


self-correction

decontextualized language

discussing not present or not visible things or ideas

achievement tests

are used to determine a student's improvement in reading, writing, and other content subjects

criterion-referenced tests

use target skills that a student is expected to have mastered by a given age

intelligence tests

attempt to measure the cognitive abilities and processing strategies of a student

curriculum specifies

what a student should learn


the sequence of learning

major goal of Deaf Education

develop sufficient English language skills so students can participate in the general curriculum


develop acceptable ASL skills so the student can become a member of the deaf community

language is

a rule-governed system composed of symbols


shared by a group of people


includes spoken and signed


changes over time

modals

spacial relationships in ASL

three major dimensions of language

form


function


use

discourse

communication in print or through the air

register

variations in the language based on whom we are talking with and in what setting

syntax

refers to rules that govern how we organize words into sentences

English syntax

uses the order of words to structure the sentence. Highlights the relationships of words to each other and sometimes give clues as to how the words should be understood in context

pragmatics

a person's ability to use a language for different functions. The rules that govern how we use language with other people

form

refers to the grammatical structure of a language

ASL morphology

the internal structure of the word. For example, pronouns are made by pointing to an object, location or a person in space

English morphology

uses the order of words to structure the sentence. Pronouns are used to take the place of the nouns with words such as he, it, this and that

phonology

speech sounds or the individual parts of a sign

modality

refers to whether a language is spoken, written, or signed

prosody

how a language stresses words and phrases and uses intonation to communicate meaning and grammatical concepts

classifiers

grammatical structures that provide information about how something looks

iconic signs

signs that look like what they are referring to

arbitrary signs

signs that are chosen or determined at random with no particular resemblance to the word they refer to

metalinguistic knowledge

means being able to think and discuss language

fingerspelling

represents English letters

audiogram

displays hearing loss

simultaneous communication

signing in English while speaking English

systems designed to represent English

signing exact English


signed English


Rochester Method

ASL

american sign language

MCE

manually coded english

PSE

pidgin sign english

2 leading national organizations, interpreting

NAD


RID

3 national or international organizations, Deaf community

NAD


Deaf Olympics


World Federation

nationwide organization for Deaf youth

Jr NAD

VRS (video relay service)

real-time interpreting services via camera

TTY

device with a keyboard used with regular telephone

VCO (voice carry over)

deaf or hard of hearing person speaks for themselves on the phone but receives either text or interpreted responses

Text Pagers (sidekicks)

commonly used for text communication between deaf people, cell phones without the voice service

home devices

baby cry alarms or signals, door bell signals, telephone signals

cochlear implant

medical device which replaces the persons cochlear

captioned videos

videos available on loan to deaf persons online or through distribution centers around the country

captioning

spoken language of TV programs printed across the TV screen