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40 Cards in this Set

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  • Back
  • 3rd side (hint)
To the peoples of the ancient world, the characteristic manifestations of civilization—government, literature, science, and art—were necessarily products of:
City life
Page 7

RQ 1
Why was life expectancy in early cities shorter than among nomadic hunter-gatherer peoples?
The carbohydrate-rich diet was less nutritious, and cramped housing in the cities resulted in increased chance of accident, smoke inhalation from fires, and increased exposure to infectious diseases.
RQ1.2
Page 11
Human cultures down to the fourth millennium B.C.E. are referred to as belonging to the Stone Age because they:
made most of their tools out of stone.
RQ1.3
Page 8
Cave paintings, such as those found in Lascaux, France, are evidence of:
development of language as well as religious and artistic ideas
RQ1.4
Page 9
Before 11,000 B.C.E., virtually all human societies were:
nomadic, moving incessantly in search of limited food.
RQ1.5
Page 9
Since human beings in the Paleolithic period had no domestic animals:
they had no significant wealth beyond what they could carry.
RQ1.6
Page 9
The switch from subsistence by food gathering to food production:
was a momentous revolution that made stable settlements possible
RQ1.7
Page 10
Jericho, one of the world’s oldest villages, emerged as a seasonal settlement around:
9,000 B.C.E.
RQ1.8
Page 12
The initial shift from village to city inhabitation took place in Mesopotamia, known to the Greeks as “The Land Between the Rivers” and to modern historians as
Sumer
RQ1.9
Page 14
Why was Sumer an uninviting environment for the first cities?
The soil is infertile and the rivers flood unpredictably.
RQ1.10
Page 14
Although early writing was produced using pointed sticks, Sumerian scribes c. 3100 B.C.E. advanced writing with durable reeds that:
produced wedge-like script called cuneiform.
RQ1.11
Page 17
Tens of thousands of Sumerian clay tablets have survived:
telling us more about Sumer than we know about any other human society at the time.
RQ1.12
Page 18
Temples were central to Sumerian city life because:
ALL THESE ARE TRUE
-they controlled a large proportion of land.
-they employed the largest number of men, women, and children.
-they dominated local and foreign trade.
RQ1.13
Page 18
The common religion of the Sumerians:
included 1,500 gods, with specific patron deities for each city-state.
RQ1.14
Page 18
Slavery in Sumerian society was:
often the result of capture during war, and limited in some ways.
RQ1.15
Page 18
An individual who successfully led the city-state’s army in battles was:
able to acquire prestige and power as a lugal (“big man”).
RQ1.16
Page 19
Although the Epic of Gilgamesh can be considered the world’s first great literary masterpiece:
historians have not been able to reconstruct an exact version of the story as it was read in ancient Sumer.
RQ1.17
Page 19
In the Epic of Gilgamesh, the dramatic confrontation between the demi-god Humbaba and the warriors Gilgamesh and Enkidu illustrates:
the deep distrust Sumerians felt toward the natural world.
RQ1.18
Page 21

Shortly before 3000 B.C.E., people in the Near East discovered that bronze could be produced by:
combining copper metal with arsenic or tin.
RQ1.19
Pages 22-23
Sargon of Akkad (c. 2350 B.C.E.) is significant because he
subdued Sumer and campaigned from Ethiopia to the India Valley.
RQ1.20
Pages 25-26
The Akkadian rulers of Sargon and Naram-Sin:
ruled from cities and kept their empires through conquest and commerce.
RQ1.21
Page 26
_________ was the first king to launch wars of aggression in the name of his primary god.
Hammurabi
RQ1.22
Page 29
Hammurabi’s empire was founded on:
political strategy and diplomacy
RQ1.23
Page 28
The Law Code of Hammurabi:
was propagandistic in purpose
RQ1.24
Page 29
The civilization that emerged in ancient Egypt arose:
at the same time as that of ancient Sumer.
RQ1.25
Page 32

Historians typically divide ancient Egyptian history into ____________ to facilitate the discussion of Egyptian politics and culture.
kingdoms and periods
RQ1.26
Page 32
Egyptian society:
consisted of a tiny minority of royalty and nobility and a majority class of the poor, including peasants and artisans.
RQ1.27
Page 38
Which of the following is not true regarding women in Egyptian society?
They could practice sexual freedom.
RQ1.28
Page 39
By 3,100 B.C.E., the rivalry in Egypt between ____________ had become extreme, and each area had its own political organizations and religious preferences.
upper and lower kingdoms
RQ1.29
Page 34
The Egyptians developed elaborate tombs and burial techniques:
to provide the dead with all they would need in the afterlife.
RQ1.30
Page 37
The Egyptian system of hieroglyphics was:
deciphered by Champollion using the Rosetta Stone.
RQ1.31
Page 35
The important administrator of the pharaoh Djoser who initiated pyramid building in the “step” style was:
Imhotep
RQ1.32
Page 37
The great Pyramids of Giza, built in the Fourth Dynasty, were:
constructed by thousands of peasant workers who were not slaves.
RQ1.33
Page 34
Before entering an enjoyable afterlife, the deceased Egyptian supposedly:
would be judged by Osiris and other divine judges.
RQ1.34
Page 40
The Egyptian “Book of the Dead” contains:
magic spells, formulae, and incantations needed in the afterlife.
RQ1.35
Page 41
The Egyptian concept of ma’at:
includes ideas of harmony, order, justice, and truth.
RQ1.36
Page 41
The Egyptians made notable advances in:
measuring time.
RQ1.37
Page 39
Which period saw Egypt expand its borders, abandon its isolationism, and change its ideal of pharaoh from a god to a “good shepherd?”
The Middle Kingdom.
RQ1.38
Page 44
Which comparison between Egypt and Mesopotamian civilizations is false?
Both enjoyed significant political and cultural interactions.
RQ1.39
Page 47
Hammurabi’s Code is the first law code that exacted equal punishment for crimes across the social spectrum.
False
RQ1.40
Page 29-31