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98 Cards in this Set

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What is Light?

Electromagnetic energy that, in certain wave-lengths, stimulates the eyes and brain.

What is Ambient Light?

Light all around us in our world.

What is value (tone)?

Lightness/darkness within a hue.
It is used to represent various levels of light that reflects off objects.

What is achromatic?

White and black (the value extremes), with the continuum of grey tones in between.

What is chromatic?

Lighter, darker, or different values of a color.

What is a hue?

It is another word for color. Pure state of color in the spectrum.

What is chiaroscuro?

Light-dark gradations that can depict objects in space. Italian for "light-dark".

Color is visible in refracted light. True or false?

True! Color is visible in refracted light.

What is refracted light?

A range of colors that is visible when a prism breaks a light beam into a spectrum of colors (a rainbow).
Think Pink Floyd's Dark Side of the Moon.

What is a spectrum?

A breakdown of white light into components of ROYGBIV.

What is reflected light?

The brightness and color of light that is bounced off of objects in the enviroment.

What is shade?

Adding black to a color.

Tint

Adding white to a color.

Intensity

Brightness and dullness of color.
Also called chroma and saturation.

What are colors?

Components of light that affects us directly by modifying our thoughts, our moods, our actions, and our health.

What is the additive color system?

Color that is created by mixing light rays.

What is the subtractive color system?

Any system of color mixing which the addition of more colors gives a duller result.

What are pigments?

Powdered substances ground into oil, acrylic polymer, or others to make paint.

Primary colors are...

Colors combined that produce the largest number of new colors.

Colors combined that produce the largest number of new colors.

Secondary colors are...

Color results when any two colors are mixed.

Color results when any two colors are mixed.


Tertiary colors are...

Colors that result from the mixing of one primary color that neighbors the secondary color.

Colors that result from the mixing of one primary color that neighbors the secondary color.

Analogous colors are...

Colors that are next to each other on the color wheel.

Colors that are next to each other on the color wheel.

Complementary colors are...

Hues that are located directly opposite of each other on the color wheel.

Hues that are located directly opposite of each other on the color wheel.

What is a color wheel?

A circular arrangement of the hues of the spectrum.

What is the relativity of color perception?

Seeing colors differently depending on the enviroment/surrounding.

What are textures?

A surface characteristic that is tactile (touchable) or visual.

What is Tactile Texture?

Consists of physical surface variations that can be perceived through touch.

Consists of physical surface variations that can be perceived through touch.

Visual Textures are...

Rendering of illusionary texture on a surface or ground.
Is simulated, abstracted, or inverted.

Simulated textures are...

Textures mimicking reality.
Ex: In realism paintings.

Abstracted textures are...

Textures that have been distorted, simplified, or exaggerated from an actual texture.

Invented textures are...

An imaginary surface quality (texture) created by the artist.
Ex: Textures in Van Gogh's paintings.

What are patterns?

An arrangement with repeated visual forms.

What are natural patterns?

Patterns that occur all around us.
Ex: In leaves and flowers, in rocks and crystal formations, in wave patterns and so on.

What are geometric patterns?

Patterns that have regular elements spaced at regular intervals.
Common in math, interior design, and art.

Patterns that have regular elements spaced at regular intervals.
Common in math, interior design, and art.

What is Surrealism?

Surrealism in an art movement during the early 20th century in Europe, that was influenced by the work of Sigmund Frued.

What are shapes?

They are 2d visual forms.

What are Regular Shapes/Geometric Shapes?

Geometric 2d visual forms with names like circle, square, triangle, etc.

Geometric 2d visual forms with names like circle, square, triangle, etc.

What are Irregular Shapes?

Geometric 2d visual forms that are unique and have no simple defining name.
Ex: Star clusters, patch colors on a cats fur.

What is Volume?

An area of occupied space.

Perspective is...

A group of methods for creating the illusion of depth on a flat picture plane.

Atmosphere Plane (Aerial Perspective) is...

Light, bleached out, fuzzy handling of distant forms to make them seem far away.

Linear Perspective is...

Parallel lines that appear to converge as they recede.

Horizon Line is...

Viewers eye level in a picture, determining what the viewer perceives as "above" or "below".

One-point Perspective is...

A drawing in which all front-facing planes are shown as parallel to the picture plane, and all other planes recede to a single point.

A drawing in which all front-facing planes are shown as parallel to the picture plane, and all other planes recede to a single point.

Two-point Perspective is...

A drawing in which no planes are parallel to the picture plane, but all recede to one of two points on the bottom.

A drawing in which no planes are parallel to the picture plane, but all recede to one of two points on the bottom.

Three-point Perspective is...

A drawing in which only one point of each volume is closest to the viewer, and all planes recede to one of three points.

A drawing in which only one point of each volume is closest to the viewer, and all planes recede to one of three points.

What is Isometric Perspective?

A perspective system for rendering 3d objects on a 2d surface by drawing all horizontal edges at a 30 degree angle from horizontal base.

A perspective system for rendering 3d objects on a 2d surface by drawing all horizontal edges at a 30 degree angle from horizontal base.

What is oblique perspective?

When a 3d object is rendered with the front and back panel.

When a 3d object is rendered with the front and back panel.


What is Multipoint Perspective?

A type of drawing that depicts forms in space as receding to two or more vanishing points, but not on the same horizontal line.

A type of drawing that depicts forms in space as receding to two or more vanishing points, but not on the same horizontal line.

What is the name of this painting and who is the artist?

What is the name of this painting and who is the artist?

"The Morning Anxiety" by Giorgio de Chirico

What is this the name of this art and who is it by?

What is this the name of this art and who is it by?

"Black Rainbow" by Cai Guo-Qiang

What is this the name of this art and who is it by?

What is this the name of this art and who is it by?

"Nude Descending Staircase (No. 2)" by Marcel Duchamp

What is composition?

Arrangement of the formal elements in a work of art.

What is balance?

Results from placing elements so that their visual weights seem evenly distributed.

What is Symmetrical Balance?

Visual weight that is evenly distributed throughout the composition.

What is Asymmetrical Balance?

The careful distribution of uneven elements.

What is Radial Balance?

All elements in the composition that visually radiate outward from a central point.

Rhythm is...

The repetition of carefully placed elements separated by intervals.

Regular Rhythm is...

Some visual elements that are systematically repeated with a standard interval in between.

Alternating Rhythm is...

Different elements that are repeatedly placed side by side, which produces a regular and anticipated sequence.

Eccentric Rhythm is...

A perceived pattern that has irregular repetition of elements or irregular spacing between elements.

What is the name of this art?

What is the name of this art?

"Churning of the Ocean Milk"

What is proportion?

The size of one part in relation to another within an artwork.

What is scale?

The size of something in relation to what we assume to be normal.

What is emphasis?

One or more focal points in an artwork.

What are accents?

Lesser focal points in an artwork.

What is unity?

When the artist organizes all the compositional elements so that they visually work together as a whole.

What is variety?

Different visual elements in a composition that add interest without disturbing its unity.

What is the name of this art and who is it by?

What is the name of this art and who is it by?

"Electronic Superhighway: Continental US, Alaska, Hawaii" by Nam June Paiks

What is the name of this art and who is it by?

What is the name of this art and who is it by?

"For the Love of God" by Damien Hirst

What are Silverpoints?

Drawings that are produced by a thin stylus made of silver that leaves marks on paper/wood coated with layers of gesso as a ground.

What is Printmaking?

The process of making multiple artworks, usually on paper, using a printing plate, woodblock, stone or stencil.

What are etchings?

Creating of lines on an area (plate), using acid that eats into exposed surfaces.
Ex: "The Weeping Woman" by Pablo Picasso

What is Lithography?

A form of printmaking invented in the 19th century, based on the principle that water and oil do not mix.

A form of printmaking invented in the 19th century, based on the principle that water and oil do not mix.

What is Seriography?

Screen printing.
A stencil is attached over a piece of stretched fabric on a frame and ink is squeezed through the open areas of the stencil and deposited on the surface below.

Screen printing.
A stencil is attached over a piece of stretched fabric on a frame and ink is squeezed through the open areas of the stencil and deposited on the surface below.

What is the name of this art and who is it by?

What is the name of this art and who is it by?

"Marylin Monroe" by Andy Warhol

What is Monotype?

A printmaking process involving drawing or painting directly on a plate, resulting in only one impression of an image.

A printmaking process involving drawing or painting directly on a plate, resulting in only one impression of an image.

What is a binder?

A substance which pigments are blended into and holds the components together once it dries.

What are the key principles of composition?

Unity, variety, balance, emphasis, contrast, repetition, rhythm, scale and proportion.

Design addresses the basic human needs for meaning and order. True or False?

True! Design addresses the basic human needs for meaning and order.

Who is Jacob Lawrence?

The first African-American painter who created dynamic cubism art that portrayed African-American life.

What is the name of this art and who is it by?

What is the name of this art and who is it by?

"Going Home" by Jacob Lawrence

What are installations?

Mixed media that is organized or placed in a specific space.

Who is Nam June Park?

A Korean-American artist who is the father of video art. He artworks involved using the power of broadcasting and media art.

Who is M.C. Esher?

A Dutch graphic artist who is known for his often mathematically inspired woodcuts, lithographs, and mezzotints.

What are mezzotints?

A method of engraving on copper or steel by burnishing or scraping away a uniformly roughened surface.

A method of engraving on copper or steel by burnishing or scraping away a uniformly roughened surface.

Who is Syd Mead?

A "visual futurist" and a neofuturistic concept artist. He is best known for his designs for science-fiction films such as Blade Runner, Aliens and Tron.

A "visual futurist" and a neofuturistic concept artist. He is best known for his designs for science-fiction films such as Blade Runner, Aliens and Tron.

What are organic shapes/biomorphic shapes?

A shape that seems to be drawn from nature or that is like nature; not geometric.

A shape that seems to be drawn from nature or that is like nature; not geometric.

What are actual lines?

Lines that physically exist. Can be broad, thin, straight, jagged, and so on.

Lines that physically exist. Can be broad, thin, straight, jagged, and so on.

What are implied lines?

Lines that do not physically exist, yet they seem quite real to viewers. Can be dotted, broke, or have pointing action.

Lines that do not physically exist, yet they seem quite real to viewers. Can be dotted, broke, or have pointing action.

What is direction?

The course of movement, as in horizontal, vertical, or diagonal.

What is line quality?

Lines that can express a range of emotions:
precision, fragility, roughness, anger, refinement, whimsy, vigor, and so on.

What are gesture lines?

Lines that are rapid, sketchy marks that mimic movement of the human eyes when examining a subject.

What is an outline?

Line that follows the outer edges of the silhouette of a 3d form with steady line thickness.

Line that follows the outer edges of the silhouette of a 3d form with steady line thickness.

What are contour lines?

Lines that mainly mark the outer edges of a 3d object, but with varying line thickness with some inner detail.

Lines that mainly mark the outer edges of a 3d object, but with varying line thickness with some inner detail.

What are cross-contour lines?

Repeated lines that go around an object to express its 3d form.

Repeated lines that go around an object to express its 3d form.

What is hatching?

Parallel lines that produce tones or values on a 3d object.

Parallel lines that produce tones or values on a 3d object.

What is cross-hatching?

Parallel lines in superimposed layers that produce tones or values on a 3d object.

Parallel lines in superimposed layers that produce tones or values on a 3d object.